Category Archives: News

4/20: The Bizarrest of Days

This 4/20 very well be one of the most bizarre days in history, with reason for celebration, mourning, reflection, and rebirth.  Today marks the first legal 4/20 for Colorado and Washington residents to smoke pot without consequence, a truly monumental event in the history of marijuana laws in the United States.  It also marks Hitler’s 125th birthday, the 100th year anniversary of the most violent labor conflict in U.S. history in Ludlow, Colorado (I know, ironic), the 15 year anniversary of the Columbine Massacre (thanks Little), and the day Jesus rose from the grave to save all sinners.  For those heading to Palmer and the Otters today, it just may be the highest form of enjoyment on yet another beautiful Vermont spring day.  Milk Boat will be going straight to the dome at the Joint concert, and the Otters will surely provide dank nuggets of uproarious laughter.  Don’t miss out.  But there’s more to today than just a toke frenzy.

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Living in the Adderall Generation: Part 2

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For those of you that picked up the newspaper today and started reading only to realize that several pages were accidentally reprinted from last week, here’s a link to Living In The Adderall Generation: Part 2.  You can see the rest of the Campus’ content online.

If you didn’t read Part 1 last week, it’s worth starting there before reading this week’s article.  Like I said last week, this is a pretty top-notch piece of journalism on a fascinating and important issue.

An excerpt from the article by Kyle Finck ’14:

The problem with living in the Adderall Generation is that you cannot just divorce yourself from these drugs altogether. As Ben learned, there is no such thing as cold turkey for students taking psychostimulants at the College. But you can learn to use the drugs responsibly and come to terms with their role here. For better or worse, from 30mg extended-release Adderall pills with breakfast to Saturday nights driven by neon blue and orange lines, we are living in the Adderall Generation.

Lunar Eclipse Tonight!

There will be a total lunar eclipse tonight!  It will begin at 12:54 and continue until 6:38 am, with the total eclipse lasting from 3:07 am to 4:25 am - during this time, the moon will appear sunset red. If you can stand to stay up a bit late, it’s worth watching this spectacular phenomenon.  If you’re like me and have no idea what a lunar eclipse really is, here’s some info lifted directly from Wikipedia:

lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes directly behind the Earth into its umbra (shadow). This can occur only when the Sun, Earth, and Moon are aligned (in “syzygy“) exactly, or very closely so, with the Earth in the middle. Hence, a lunar eclipse can only occur the night of a full moon. The type and length of an eclipse depend upon the Moon’s location relative to its orbital nodes.

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Middlebury’s Fading Honor Code in the New York Times

Yes! We’ve made it to New York Times!

Wait..

“The campus tour for prospective Middlebury students stops in a corridor outside a much-frequented eatery at the student center. Here, the guide directs their attention to a glass case exhibiting signatures of every freshman who has signed the honor code, a pledge made during orientation. To high school students fresh out of the SAT and A.P. grind, these signatures suggest that the competition for high scores is over; learning would now be fuller and more meaningful. Lowering their gaze, however, they might notice three trash bins lined up under the display. This juxtaposition looks to be a fitting metaphor for Middlebury’s attitude toward its honor code.”

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at least we recycle…

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Living in the Adderall Generation: Part 1

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If you haven’t heard the buzz about this article in the Middlebury Campus today, you’ve probably noticed people with the paper open to a spread full of pictures of people snorting lines of adderall. Kyle Finck ’14 has been working on this multi-part piece since last March and has been following six students and their experience with the drug as well as a number of experts in the field, both on campus and off.  This is arguably one of the best journalistic pieces that the Campus has presented in years, not to mention it tackles a major issue on College campuses around the country in a very personal and accessible way by providing both the facts and the opinions and challenging many common misconceptions.  

Definitely read the article and keep an eye out for more in the coming weeks – it’s guaranteed to open your eyes to the scale of prescription drug use on campus and might make you reconsider your own use of the drug.  I wouldn’t be surprised if this coverage makes it to the national news given it’s importance on a broader scale and relevance outside this college, but I’m ever the optimist.  In any case, major props to Kyle for his hard work on this.  

Students Launch Blog: Beyond the Green

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A group of students launched a new blog today devoted to providing a space for voices that are not being heard on campus. I’ll let them take it from here – here’s some information from one of the founders who asked to remain anonymous:

We’re proud to be announcing beyond the green, a collective of middlebury voices that will be represented in an online publication as the centralized location of our voices (launching today) as well as a weekly column in The Campus. beyond the green aims to provide space for voices that are not being heard on our campus. As a collective and as a publication, beyond the green is unique because it is grounded by politics that are radical, anti-racist, anti-sexist, anti-classist, anti-ableist, and anti-homophobic (as well as strongly opposed to all forms of oppression). You can read more about beyond the green in this week’s Campus opinion section or at our blog at go/beyondthegreen.

beyond the green is accepting submissions on a rolling basis (for the rest of eternity). because beyond the green is a new publication, we hope that a diverse group of students will claim ownership over the blog by beginning to use the blog on a regular basis. please send pieces of writing (rants, lists, stories, poems, mini-essays, reviews of campus events, opinion pieces on shit happening in the “real world,” personal statements, etc.) as well as video blogs, photographs, cartoons, drawings, artwork, coverage of events and activism at midd, etc., in line with our mission statement, to beyondthegreen14[at]gmail[dot]com. also contact if you would like to become a regular contributor.

Check out the blog – there’s already great content up, not to mention the sweet banner image above.

Not sure what classes to take? Check out MiddCourses

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Registration for fall courses begins tomorrow (find out when you’re registering here).  If you’re wondering about a certain class or professor, you might want to hear from students that have taken a course in the past.  Until now, all we had was middkid.com for this, a system that provided very few helpful reviews, often strongly biased.  Now there’s MiddCourses, a site created by the SGA to provide an essential and hopefully more effective method for sharing course evaluations. The site launched last week and it looks awesome.

Teddy Knox ’15 helped design the site with Dana Silver ’16 and Rachel Liddell ’15 and wrote in with this information about this site:

MiddCourses.com is a new student-run course reviews website commissioned by Rachel Liddell, which Dana Silver and I have been writing over the last six months. The sole purpose of this site will be to provide students with information about Midd’s course offerings, and with this focus we hope to make the best course reviews website we can imagine. We’ve designed MiddCourses to be as clean and easy to use as possible (on smartphones too!), and we think that its new quota system will encourage students to contribute reviews over the long term. Students here already want to share their course experiences, so we built a platform that lets them do this and doesn’t get in their way.

When Dana, Rachel and I started this project, it was clear that our biggest challenge would be convincing students to actively contribute reviews as well as read them. The trouble is that the fewer reviews a site receives, the more likely those reviews are to be outliers with strong opinions. My friend Dylan Igoe joked about this, “if I see two bad reviews for a class on MiddKid it’s completely off the table”.

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TODAY: Gabriel Sherman ’01 Meet the Press Talk

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If you are at all interested in journalism, politics, communications or media, especially the bombastic institution that is Fox news, you should absolutely not miss today’s Meet the Press talk with New York Times Bestselling author Gabriel Sherman ’01, titled “Inside the Secret World of Fox News Chairman Roger Ailes – The Man Who Remade American Politics.” Middbeat had the opportunity to interview Sherman yesterday – be sure to check out his career path and book description here.

Gabe Sherman ’01 is the author of the New York Times Bestselling (currently very popular and hotly debated) book The Loudest Voice in the Room: How the Brilliant, Bombastic Roger Ailes Built Fox News – And Divided a Country. Sherman’s book, published by Random House in January 2014, is a biography of Fox News CEO and President Roger Ailes documenting Ailes’ professional career, extremely eccentric character, and the history of the Fox News industry – it is described as “A deeply reported journey inside the secretive world of Fox News and the life of its combative, visionary founder.” Sherman is a contributing editor at New York Magazine and also currently a Bernard L. Schwartz Fellow at the New American Foundation.

Sherman’s personal site explains how “at New York, Sherman has reported cover stories on media, politics and business. His 2011 cover story “The Elephant in the Green Room,” about Roger Ailes’s role in shaping the 2012 Republican presidential primary, was a finalist for the Mirror Award for “Best Single Article”. His 2010 cover story “Chasing Fox,” about the travails at CNN and MSNBC, won the Mirror Award in that category. In 2008, his cover story “Testing Horace Mann,” chronicled a Facebook scandal at the prestigious New York City prep school, and was a finalist for the Livingston Award.” Sherman has served as a guest on CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, ABC World News and National Public Radio, and his journalism has appeared in the New York Times, the Guardian, Slate, GQ, the Atlantic, Wired, Outside Magazine and National Geographic Adventure, among other publications. He was even a recent guest on the Colbert Report, check it out here.

Today’s talk will focus on the subject of Sherman’s book, Fox CEO and President Roger Ailes, and how his development of Fox News has changed our country’s political climate forever. Not to miss!

Date: Today, Tuesday, April 1
Time: 4:30 – 5:30 PM
Place: Bicentennial Hall 216
Cost: Free

PREVIEW: Q+A With Gabriel Sherman ’01, New York Times Bestselling Author

Gabe Sherman '01, author of The Loudest Voice in the Room

Gabriel Sherman ’01, author of The Loudest Voice in the Room

PREVIEW TO GABE SHERMAN’S MEET THE PRESS TALK TOMORROW: ”Inside the Secret World of Fox News Chairman Roger Ailes–The Man Who Remade American Politics”

Today, middbeat had the honor to speak with author and journalist Gabriel Sherman ’01, who will be speaking at tomorrow’s Meet the Press event titled: “Inside the Secret World of Fox News’ Roger Ailes–the Man Who Remade American Politics.” Gabe Sherman ’01 is the author of the New York Times Bestselling (currently very popular and hotly debated) book The Loudest Voice in the Room: How the Brilliant, Bombastic Roger Ailes Built Fox News – And Divided a Country. Sherman’s book, published by Random House in January 2014, is a biography of Fox News CEO and President Roger Ailes documenting Ailes’ professional career, extremely eccentric character, and the history of the Fox News industry – it is described as “A deeply reported journey inside the secretive world of Fox News and the life of its combative, visionary founder.” Sherman is a contributing editor at New York Magazine and also currently a Bernard L. Schwartz Fellow at the New American Foundation.

Sherman’s personal site explains how “at New York, Sherman has reported cover stories on media, politics and business. His 2011 cover story “The Elephant in the Green Room,” about Roger Ailes’s role in shaping the 2012 Republican presidential primary, was a finalist for the Mirror Award for “Best Single Article”. His 2010 cover story “Chasing Fox,” about the travails at CNN and MSNBC, won the Mirror Award in that category. In 2008, his cover story “Testing Horace Mann,” chronicled a Facebook scandal at the prestigious New York City prep school, and was a finalist for the Livingston Award.” Sherman has served as a guest on CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, ABC World News and National Public Radio, and his journalism has appeared in the New York Times, the Guardian, Slate, GQ, the Atlantic, Wired, Outside Magazine and National Geographic Adventure, among other publications. He was even a recent guest on the Colbert Report, check it out here.

In this Q+A middbeat had the opportunity to learn about both Sherman’s journey from a Political Science and Geography joint major at Middlebury to a New York Times Bestselling author, and the story behind his new book. If you are at all interested in journalism, politics, or both, you should absolutely check out Sherman’s professional advice and show up to his Meet the Press talk tomorrow (Tuesday) at 4:30!

M: What did you study at Middlebury, and do you think Middlebury equipped you well for your career path and goals? What do you think the most useful skills you learned at Middlebury?

S: At Middlebury I was a joint Political Science and Geography major. I think the most important and valuable skills that I learned at Middlebury were the abilities to think, write and to ask insightful questions. Through my Middlebury course work and relationships with professors I learned how to process complex questions that don’t have readily available answers. These critical thinking, writing, and question asking skills are directly applicable to journalism because the stories that I work on are multifaceted and complex and require ability to process lots of information and communicate that reporting to my readers.

I didn’t go to journalism school, I learned by doing. I think the best skills are the ones you learn by doing. At Middlebury you have opportunities to do journalism with school publications, and there are many avenues to gain actual skills by doing. In terms of actual journalism skills I learned by getting entry level jobs and acquiring skills by learning craft and being in real world.

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