Category Archives: Culture

Amnesty International: Silent March against Police Brutality on Campus

Screen Shot 2014-10-21 at 20.46.56

Today Wednesday 22nd October in commemoration of the National Day to Stop Police Brutality, Repression, and the Criminalization of a Generation, a silent march will be held on campus for the purpose of both bringing awareness, and standing in solidarity with those directly and indirectly afflicted by the consequences of police brutality.

The march will begin at 5.30 pm outside Ross dining hall and will follow down College Street, crossing over to Warner, passing through Davis Family library and up to Mead Chapel, with occasional stops where organizers will read biographies or pieces about subjects of police brutraity. The march is scheduled to end in front of Mead Chapel at around 6.30 pm. Marchers will be wearing all black (extra black shirts will be provided for those who don’t possess one).

If you would like to make your own posters/signs, the Crest Room at McCullough will be open from 2-5 PM and there will supplies provided (markers, pencils, paper, etc.). You are welcome to show up anytime. A group of students will convene at Crest Room at 4:30 PM to discuss logistics for the day and make posters. Led candles will also be available.

Please join in and support a cause that has become very prominent these past few years with police shootings and the increasing militarization putting into question the role and context of our policing forces. for more information click here

The march is hosted by DMC, Women of Color, Alianza, and Amnesty International.

When: Today Wednesday 22nd October 5.30 pm
Where: starts outside Ross dining Hall

We hope to see you all there! Take a stance, and make change, Middlebury.

 

 

Midd Geographic Now Accepting Submissions

PosterCoversmall copy

Midd’s premier student-run publication for independent research, travel, and cartography Middlebury Geographic, is now accepting submissions for its fall issue.  Middlebury Geographic is designed to capture and celebrate the stories, independent research, and worldwide initiatives of the Middlebury College student body. Middlebury Geographic attempts to reflect and reinforce the college’s tradition of international awareness, diversity and critical inquiry.

Inspired by the widely circulated National Geographic and J.B. Jackson’s Landscape magazine, Middlebury Geographic combines quality journalism with narrative photography and creative cartography, in attempt to present geographic concepts to the “intelligent layman,” rather than the specialist. Since established in the Spring of 2009, Middlebury Geographic has continued to publish two issues every academic year.  Check out past issues here.

If you are interested in writing a short or long piece, or submitting photography or maps, send them on over to mgATmiddleburyDOTedu.  Submissions are due by Halloween.  Big thanks to Lillie Hodges & Anthea Viragh ’15 for the tip and for organizing this year’s publications.

Thursday: NER Vermont Reading Series

NER

Come spend a relaxing evening at Carol’s Hungry Mind Café tomorrow and listen to some great Vermont authors read from their recent works. The NER Vermont Reading Series presents a fall evening with three Vermont writers: Emily Arnason Casey, Kathryn Davis, and Diana Whitney.

Emily Arnason Casey’s writing has appeared in Mid-American Review, Sonora Review, the anthology Please Do Not Remove, and elsewhere. She was a finalist for the 2014 Ruth Stone Poetry Prize. She earned an MFA from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and teaches writing at the Community College of Vermont. An editor at the online journal Atlas & Alice, Emily lives in Burlington with her husband and two sons, and is working on a collection of essays about loss and longing.

Kathryn Davis is the author of seven novels: Labrador, The Girl Who Trod on a Loaf, Hell, The Walking Tour, Versailles, The Thin Place, and Duplex (Graywolf, 2013). She has been the recipient of the Kafka Prize, the Morton Dauwen Zabel Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the 2006 Lannan Award for Fiction. She lives in Vermont and is Hurst Senior Writer-in-Residence in the MFA program at Washington University in St. Louis.

Diana Whitney’s first book of poetry, Wanting It, was released in August 2014 by Harbor Mountain Press. Her essays and poems have appeared in the Boston Globe, the Washington Post, Crab Orchard Review, Puerto del Sol, Numéro Cinq, Dartmouth Alumni Magazine, and elsewhere. She graduated from Dartmouth College and Oxford University, where she was a Rhodes Scholar, and attended the Warren Wilson College MFA Program. A yoga instructor and lifelong athlete, Diana lives in Brattleboro with her family.

Date: Thursday, October 23rd
Time: 7 – 8:30pm
Place:
Carol’s Hungry Mind Café (24 Merchants Row, Middlebury VT)

WRMC presents: Grooveyard 2014 feat. Big Freedia

Freedia_FINAL_COVER_3001-624x624

With Ron Liebowitz departing our dear college following this academic year, it is widely acknowledged the school will face a staggering drop in twerking. Fear not, Middleburians, for WRMC has just announced that Big Freediaworld record-holding twerkerQueen of Bounce and transcendent being of light will be headlining their annual fall concertGrooveyard, on Friday, November 7 in the Bunker. Big Freedia is kind of like DJ Mustard if he were a post-gender intergalactic twerking warrior who does battle in New Orleans dance clubs. By that we mean Big Freedia is nothing like DJ Mustard, but that the concert will be an insane experience that has never happened before and may never happen again on this campus. Seriously. This concert is history in the making and you don’t want to miss out. As Freedia once said, “Free your azzzzzz and your mind will follow.

In the spirit of Big Freedia’s credo, WRMC will also host a community discussion regarding how we can be mindful consumers of art and music in our pluralistic society. Join us in addressing the history of New Orleans bounce music, twerking, cultural appropriation within the music industry, preferred pronouns, and the politics of identity. Some of the school’s heavy-weights—students and professors alike—will be there so that, before deciding to twerk for possibly the last time at Midd, Ron Liebowitz can be fully aware of the cultural implications, origins, and forms of institutional power surrounding his booty-shaking. More details to follow! The official facebook event can be found here.

Check out more Big Freedia below: 

For inquiries or comments feel free to contact the WRMC Concert Chairs Charlie Dulik and Aaron Slater.

~Free Your Mind~

Cost: $5 (tickets will go on sale a week before show time)
Where: The Bunker
When: Friday, November 7, 9:30 p.m.

TODAY: Saha Global Leadership Program Virtual Info Session

Did you know: 
780 million people around the world lack access to safe drinking water.

 Water-related diseases, like diarrhea, dysentery and cholera, kill more people every year than all forms of violence, including war.
The most vulnerable population are children under the age of five.
Globally, 1.3 billion people, over 18% of the world’s population, live without electricity.

That’s where Saha Global comes in:
38,108 people served
100% sustainability rate

Saha Global is an incredible non-profit based in Northern Ghana, looking for students and young professionals who:
  • Are passionate about international social justice, environmental sustainability and public health
  • Are peer leaders looking to build project management skills
  • Looking for a unique experience Northern Region, Ghana
  • Can help a rural community solve its water or electricity needs by starting a small business

Sound like you? If so, be sure to Join Kate Clopeck, Saha’s Co-Founder and Executive Director for a virtual info session on October 20th at 5pm and learn how you can make a sustainable impact during your winter or summer break by participating in their three-week Global Leadership Program in Ghana. Register for the online info session here! Read on for more info about Saha Global:

Saha Global empowers women in rural communities in northern Ghana to solve their village’s need for clean water and electricity by providing business opportunities. They do this by bringing leaders from around the world to Ghana through our Global Leadership Program where they train local women to launch profitable social enterprises such as sustainable pure water and solar energy businesses. All of the revenue from these businesses stays in the community and is managed by the women entrepreneurs. To date, Saha Global has launched 71 clean water businesses and 5 solar electricity businesses, which empower 164 women entrepreneurs who serve 38,108 people. 100% of these businesses are still in operation today.

The three week Saha Global Leadership Program in Ghana has run successfully since the Summer of 2010, and over 10 Midd students have participated. The Saha site explains the program as follows:

Young leaders who participate in Saha’s three-week Global Leadership Program will be trained to become Saha Field Representatives. Before traveling abroad, they will fundraise to cover the start-up materials needed for each community business, as well as their in-country travel expenses. Once in Ghana, they will participate in a vigorous and comprehensive training program designed and led by our Saha Global team. Groups of four will be partnered with a rural community in which they will first introduce the business concept and its particular health, social and economic benefits, and then train local women to launch either a clean water or solar business.

By the end of the three-week program, these businesses will be up and running and the women entrepreneurs will be fully in charge of all operations. Our Saha Global team will then monitor the business for the next 5 years to ensure long-term success.

For more information about Saha Global, read their story hereSaha is currently accepting applications for 2015 Winter Global Leadership Program, which takes place in Ghana from December 28th – January 20th (J-TERM), as well as their summer 2015 program. Don’t miss the online info session today! All are welcome. 

What: Virtual Info Session for Saha Global
Date: Today, October 20
Time: 5 – 6pm
Place: Online, register here

Alcohol Policy at Stanford and Middlebury: Which Approach is Right?

maxresdefault

The most recent spark in the alcohol policy debate comes not from Middlebury, but from across the country at Stanford University where Miriam Pollock recently published an editorial comparing Middlebury and Stanford’s alcohol policy.  An incredibly well-written, and insightful piece, Pollock’s perspective casts new light on the different approaches collegiate institutions can take in addressing alcohol consumption.  What follows is a re-posting of the Stanford Review piece.  Please feel free to share your thoughts and comments below.  Credit is due to Miriam Pollock and the Stanford Review.

Students file into the stands above Youngman Field, decked out in white and blue. The visiting team scores a quick touchdown, dampening the crowd’s spirits. But soon thereafter, quarterback Matt Milano launches an eighty-yard drive that ends in a dramatic touchdown. The students and alumni in the stadium go wild.

Meanwhile, a junior, removed from the action of the game, stumbles across Route 30 into the woods and unloads his lunch. He can barely walk. The junior had drunk heavily at the pre-football game tailgate. A Public Safety officer spots the student and determines he needs to be transported to the hospital. The student is sent to the hospital and safely recovers from his alcohol poisoning. Subsequently, he will receive both punishment and counseling.

The scene should be familiar to anyone who has attended a college football game: some students go too crazy at the tailgates, endangering themselves and others. Often, they will never even make it to the game. This scenario — with a different stadium, different quarterback, and different students — could play out almost anywhere in the US. But in this case the specific game took place at Middlebury College, a small liberal arts school in Vermont.

Understandably, the Middlebury administration — like many college administrations across the country — wants to reduce incidents of binge drinking at tailgates. And so, on September 16th of this year, Erin Quinn, Director of Athletics, announced a new policy. Alcohol was completely prohibited at tailgates, even for those 21 and over. (“Loud” music was also banned, causing students to question whether the policy was meant to protect them or to prevent them from having fun.)

While ensuring students remain safe is a laudable goal, this misguided policy is unlikely to accomplish that. In fact, this policy may even encourage binge drinking. Furthermore, it impinges on student freedom. Contrast all this with Stanford University, which has a far more relaxed alcohol policy. Residential staff champion an “open-door” policy. Students are encouraged to drink with their doors open; in turn, Residence Assistants (RAs) promise only to intervene if students’ safety is at risk. Is Stanford’s model more effective at keeping students safe? Which is right — the zero-tolerance approach, or Stanford’s more tolerant one?

Continue reading

Leland Person ’69: “Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Huckleberry Finn, and the Psychology of Lynching”

uncle-toms-cabin

Midd alum and Professor of English at the University of Cincinnati Leland Person ’69 will be lecturing on the construction of lynching in 19th century American literature today at 4:30 in Axinn 109.  Mari Price writes in:

Leland Person will give a talk entitled, “Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Huckleberry Finn, and the Psychology of Lynching.” Professor Person is the author or editor of several books and is a full professor of English at the University of Cincinnati who works on 19th-century American literature, gender and sexuality, and literature and the environment. This talk involves research from his next book, tentatively entitled, “Writing White, Writing Black,” and explores the racial, social, and psychological underpinnings of spectacle lynching as represented in American literature.

A former undergraduate at Middlebury College, Leland Person was elected to alumni membership PBK in May and will be receiving his certificate at the talk.

When: Today 4:30-6
Where: Axinn 109
Cost: Free

Granite Stoke Surf Movie Saturday

Tomorrow evening at 5 PM, Ryan Scura ’11 will be screening his film Granite Stoke in Axinn 232.  Granite Stoke focuses on the vibrant surfing culture on New Hampshire’s 18 miles of coastline, and thus far has been an official selection at the London Surf/Film Festival, the New Hampshire Film Festival, and the Honolulu Film Festival just to name a few.  Ryan and lifelong buddy Dylan Ladds have been making films together since middle school, and have struck gold with Granite Stoke which, according to the London Surf/Film Festival review board, “captures the very essence of surfing and what makes the friends we meet through it so special.”  Weaving surfing footage with the story of a tight knit community, the film should be a real treat.  Ryan will stick around after the screening for a Q & A.  The event is co-sponsored by the Programs in Creativity and Innovation and the Film and Media Culture Department.

When: Saturday, 5 PM
Where: Axinn 232
Cost: Free

Homecoming Weekend: Motown Dance, Mingling, Panel Discussion, Free Noonie’s and More!

unnamed-1

If there’s one fall semester highlight we can all agree on, it’s Homecoming Weekend, and Middlebury’s student group Women of Color know how to celebrate right! WOC writes in to tell us about all the awesome events they are co-sponsoring for Homecoming 2014, October 17-19 (everyone is welcome at every event!):

African American Alliance (AAA), Alianza, Distinguished Men of Color (DMC), PALANA House (Pan-African, Latino, Asian, and Native American House), and WOC have a jam packed schedule for this homecoming weekend, and we hope ya’ll are ready and excited!! Here’s what’s up:

We are kicking off the weekend with a reception (Friday, 6-7:30, Carr Hall) where students and alums are free to mingle with one another and have some free munches from The Grille! Following the reception, we will transition into a panel (7:30-9, Carr Hall) where alums will talk about their life after Midd. So, if you are interested in what that liberal arts degree will really do for your future, make sure to come out to the panel! Alums from different generations and various career fields will be joining us!

But don’t get too tied down with future planning, because we will be celebrating our flawless selves in PALANA House Friday Night (10:30) with an all-night dance party with Darkstar DJs!

But wait, there’s more! Come support the football team for a Homecoming win and stop by the AAA Concessions Stand (Saturday, 1pm, Football Field) to support the African American Alliance in an age old tradition of providing food for game-goers.

If you didn’t get a chance to dance with Darkstar, don’t fret because the best and baddest party of the year is on Saturday…Black Pearl Ball (10-2am, Coltrane Lounge)! This year’s theme is Motown! Think Diana Ross and The Supremes! Jackson 5! Marvin Gaye!

Come dressed in semi-formal attire wear or your best 1970s outfit or whatever floats your boat, but please leave cultural appropriation at home!

Get ready to dance down the soul train line. So bring your moves, grooves, and let’s party like it’s the 1970s! After a fun, energy-filled weekend, come down to Chellis House on Sunday (11AM) for your last chance to connect with alums of color until next year and yes, there will be brunch catered by Noonie’s, that is if you can wake up from last night ;)

Events Schedule:

Friday:
Reception - 6 – 7:30 PM in Carr Hall
Panel – 7:30 - 9PM in Carr Hall
Dark Star DJ Party – 10:30 PM in PALANA House

Saturday:
Homecoming Game AAA Concession Stand – 1pm at the football field
Black Pearl Ball - 10 PM – 2 AM Coltrane Lounge (accessible by ramp through the Adirondack House CCI)

Sunday:
Brunch - 11 AM in the Chellis House

SOUL TRAIN, Full Force performs, early 1980s, 1971-

Friday Talk: Craving Earth

pica-2For all interested in psychology, biology, nutrition, Africa, or strange phenomenons: this Friday we have a special talk by Sera Young, an anthropologist from Cornell, that covers all of these topics! Her talk “Craving Earth” addresses pica, which is the urge to eat clay, starch, ice and chalk. Sera’s work in anthropology is on maternal and child nutrition, with a particular emphasis on how mothers in low-resource settings cope to preserve the health of their children. Her ongoing research is in Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, and Mozambique.

Date: Friday, October 10
Time: 11am – noon
Place: Axinn 229