Category Archives: Culture

Possession is Nine Tenths of the Law

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Come check out another amazing M Gallery Exhibition featuring Sam Tolzmanm, ’14.5

When: Saturday, October 25 from 2 to 8 PM
Where: M Gallery | The Old Stone Mill | #3 Mill Street | Middlebury, VT 05753
Cost: Free

Here is the press release from M Gallery:

 

MGallert

 

M Gallery Exhibit Press Release

Possession is nine tenths of the law | Sam Tolzmann

Notes:

  • We should never include a phone number on public listings. Contact the gallery directors if such a situation should arise.
  • If an email address will be publicly visible it should be: mgallery@middlebry.edu

Exhibition:
Possession is nine tenths of the law

Artist:
Sam Tolzmann, ’14.5

Opening:
Saturday, Oct. 25th

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1516919408554738/

Brief Description:
Samuel Tolzmann ’14.5′s final exhibition at Middlebury, Possession is nine tenths of the law. combines drawing and interactive performance within a specifically engineered, highly manipulated spatial environment designed to be both disruptive and immersive. It is an intensely private meditation on the essential horror of sexual embodiment. Obsessively figural and thoroughly allusive, the exhibition twists domestic and gallery routine as it attempts to express queerly fraught visions of failure: of illegible masculinities, unattainable fantasies, alien nourishments, botched exorcisms, pointless labors, ineffectual communication, and malfunctioning or altogether insufficient boundaries. The artist probes the psychological value and social contexts of punishment, performance, (pro)creation, and other repetitive actions that frequently occur in the home, ambiguously troubling the conventional power dynamics motivating identity and intimacy. His range of depicted, assumed, and imposed postures appear violently degrading, subjugating, and self-abnegating, but this reading is complicated by their deliberate intentionality, voluntary dutifulness, and willful urgency.

The M Gallery opens at 2:00 PM and at 3:00 PM SHARP Tolzmann will debut two new performances back-to-back, Power failure and Bread alone. Family members visiting for the weekend are encouraged to attend as well, however, please note that due to the adult nature of the work, no one under 18 years of age will be admitted. Light refreshments will be served.

Address:

M Gallery | The Old Stone Mill | #3 Mill Street | Middlebury, VT 05753

 

Paul Ward ’25 Prize for Excellence in First Year Writing Tonight

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Senior Lecturer and Director of the Writing Center Mary Ellen Bertolini writes in:

Friday, October 24 in Twilight Auditorium between 4:15 and 6:00 marks the 37th annual presentation of the Paul Ward Prize for excellence in writing by first-year students. The Writing Program and the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research will honor the 65 members of the class of 2018 who were nominated for this prize. The winner receives a check for $500; the two Runner Ups receive $250 each, and we will also honor students who will receive Honorable Mention. Students nominated for the Ward prize are invited by the Writing Center in the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research to train as peer writing tutors and writing and academic mentors.

middbeat will be covering the event and feature the winners.  Stay tuned for more on the results of the prize ceremony.

When: Tonight at 4:15 and 6 PM
Where: Twilight Auditorium
Cost: Free

Tibetan Monks to Create Sand Mandala in Library

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If you weren’t aware, over the past few days a group of Tibetan monks have been creating the Sand Mandala of Chenrezig (in Tibetan) or Avalokiteshvara (in Sanskrit), the Bodhisattva of Great Compassion in the Davis Library Atrium. The opening prayer ceremonies for the mandala were held yesterday, and Sunday today the mandala will be dismantled at 4 pm , after which the sand will be dispersed in Otter Creek. The monks will work daily from 9 a.m.-12 p.m., and 2p.m.-4 p.m, and all are invited to attend, watch, and accompany the monks to the Otter Creek for the dismantling ceremony.

All sounds super cool, but begs me to ask, what is the Sand Mandala of Chenrezig? In truth, we are rather uneducated about Buddhist deities and religious practices, so we’ve decided to compile some info for all of us to educate ourselves. The Mandala of Chenrezig has got quite a rich history, so be sure to read up, and check out the mandala unveiling tomorrow.

Date: Today, October 24
Time: Dismantling at 4pm Sunday
Place: Davis Family Atrium (unveiling), Otter Creek (dispersal of sand)

Information on the history of the mandala beyond the jump:

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Emerging Adulthood: Psychology and Portraiture

This Friday, Professor of psychology Barbara Hofer will be joining artist Kate Gridley for a collaborative, interdisciplinary talk given in conjunction with a viewing of Gridleys exhibition, Passing Through: Portraits of Emerging Adults. Many psychologists now view individuals between the ages of 18 and 25 as inhabiting a newly defined life phase between adolescence and adulthood—a period termed “emerging adulthood.” This series of life-sized oil portraits will feature an artist-led tour by Gridley herself in the lower lobby immediately following the talk (also at Town Hall Theater at 4:00 PM).

And yes, on top of an exhibition well respected and locally produced art, refreshments are sure to be provided.

When: Friday, October 24 12:30 pm

Where: Mahaney Center for the Arts, Dance Theatre

Cost: Free

Amnesty International: Silent March against Police Brutality on Campus

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Today Wednesday 22nd October in commemoration of the National Day to Stop Police Brutality, Repression, and the Criminalization of a Generation, a silent march will be held on campus for the purpose of both bringing awareness, and standing in solidarity with those directly and indirectly afflicted by the consequences of police brutality.

The march will begin at 5.30 pm outside Ross dining hall and will follow down College Street, crossing over to Warner, passing through Davis Family library and up to Mead Chapel, with occasional stops where organizers will read biographies or pieces about subjects of police brutraity. The march is scheduled to end in front of Mead Chapel at around 6.30 pm. Marchers will be wearing all black (extra black shirts will be provided for those who don’t possess one).

If you would like to make your own posters/signs, the Crest Room at McCullough will be open from 2-5 PM and there will supplies provided (markers, pencils, paper, etc.). You are welcome to show up anytime. A group of students will convene at Crest Room at 4:30 PM to discuss logistics for the day and make posters. Led candles will also be available.

Please join in and support a cause that has become very prominent these past few years with police shootings and the increasing militarization putting into question the role and context of our policing forces. for more information click here

The march is hosted by DMC, Women of Color, Alianza, and Amnesty International.

When: Today Wednesday 22nd October 5.30 pm
Where: starts outside Ross dining Hall

We hope to see you all there! Take a stance, and make change, Middlebury.

 

 

Midd Geographic Now Accepting Submissions

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Midd’s premier student-run publication for independent research, travel, and cartography Middlebury Geographic, is now accepting submissions for its fall issue.  Middlebury Geographic is designed to capture and celebrate the stories, independent research, and worldwide initiatives of the Middlebury College student body. Middlebury Geographic attempts to reflect and reinforce the college’s tradition of international awareness, diversity and critical inquiry.

Inspired by the widely circulated National Geographic and J.B. Jackson’s Landscape magazine, Middlebury Geographic combines quality journalism with narrative photography and creative cartography, in attempt to present geographic concepts to the “intelligent layman,” rather than the specialist. Since established in the Spring of 2009, Middlebury Geographic has continued to publish two issues every academic year.  Check out past issues here.

If you are interested in writing a short or long piece, or submitting photography or maps, send them on over to mgATmiddleburyDOTedu.  Submissions are due by Halloween.  Big thanks to Lillie Hodges & Anthea Viragh ’15 for the tip and for organizing this year’s publications.

Thursday: NER Vermont Reading Series

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Come spend a relaxing evening at Carol’s Hungry Mind Café tomorrow and listen to some great Vermont authors read from their recent works. The NER Vermont Reading Series presents a fall evening with three Vermont writers: Emily Arnason Casey, Kathryn Davis, and Diana Whitney.

Emily Arnason Casey’s writing has appeared in Mid-American Review, Sonora Review, the anthology Please Do Not Remove, and elsewhere. She was a finalist for the 2014 Ruth Stone Poetry Prize. She earned an MFA from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and teaches writing at the Community College of Vermont. An editor at the online journal Atlas & Alice, Emily lives in Burlington with her husband and two sons, and is working on a collection of essays about loss and longing.

Kathryn Davis is the author of seven novels: Labrador, The Girl Who Trod on a Loaf, Hell, The Walking Tour, Versailles, The Thin Place, and Duplex (Graywolf, 2013). She has been the recipient of the Kafka Prize, the Morton Dauwen Zabel Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the 2006 Lannan Award for Fiction. She lives in Vermont and is Hurst Senior Writer-in-Residence in the MFA program at Washington University in St. Louis.

Diana Whitney’s first book of poetry, Wanting It, was released in August 2014 by Harbor Mountain Press. Her essays and poems have appeared in the Boston Globe, the Washington Post, Crab Orchard Review, Puerto del Sol, Numéro Cinq, Dartmouth Alumni Magazine, and elsewhere. She graduated from Dartmouth College and Oxford University, where she was a Rhodes Scholar, and attended the Warren Wilson College MFA Program. A yoga instructor and lifelong athlete, Diana lives in Brattleboro with her family.

Date: Thursday, October 23rd
Time: 7 – 8:30pm
Place:
Carol’s Hungry Mind Café (24 Merchants Row, Middlebury VT)

WRMC presents: Grooveyard 2014 feat. Big Freedia

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With Ron Liebowitz departing our dear college following this academic year, it is widely acknowledged the school will face a staggering drop in twerking. Fear not, Middleburians, for WRMC has just announced that Big Freediaworld record-holding twerkerQueen of Bounce and transcendent being of light will be headlining their annual fall concertGrooveyard, on Friday, November 7 in the Bunker. Big Freedia is kind of like DJ Mustard if he were a post-gender intergalactic twerking warrior who does battle in New Orleans dance clubs. By that we mean Big Freedia is nothing like DJ Mustard, but that the concert will be an insane experience that has never happened before and may never happen again on this campus. Seriously. This concert is history in the making and you don’t want to miss out. As Freedia once said, “Free your azzzzzz and your mind will follow.

In the spirit of Big Freedia’s credo, WRMC will also host a community discussion regarding how we can be mindful consumers of art and music in our pluralistic society. Join us in addressing the history of New Orleans bounce music, twerking, cultural appropriation within the music industry, preferred pronouns, and the politics of identity. Some of the school’s heavy-weights—students and professors alike—will be there so that, before deciding to twerk for possibly the last time at Midd, Ron Liebowitz can be fully aware of the cultural implications, origins, and forms of institutional power surrounding his booty-shaking. More details to follow! The official facebook event can be found here.

Check out more Big Freedia below: 

For inquiries or comments feel free to contact the WRMC Concert Chairs Charlie Dulik and Aaron Slater.

~Free Your Mind~

Cost: $5 (tickets will go on sale a week before show time)
Where: The Bunker
When: Friday, November 7, 9:30 p.m.

TODAY: Saha Global Leadership Program Virtual Info Session

Did you know: 
780 million people around the world lack access to safe drinking water.

 Water-related diseases, like diarrhea, dysentery and cholera, kill more people every year than all forms of violence, including war.
The most vulnerable population are children under the age of five.
Globally, 1.3 billion people, over 18% of the world’s population, live without electricity.

That’s where Saha Global comes in:
38,108 people served
100% sustainability rate

Saha Global is an incredible non-profit based in Northern Ghana, looking for students and young professionals who:
  • Are passionate about international social justice, environmental sustainability and public health
  • Are peer leaders looking to build project management skills
  • Looking for a unique experience Northern Region, Ghana
  • Can help a rural community solve its water or electricity needs by starting a small business

Sound like you? If so, be sure to Join Kate Clopeck, Saha’s Co-Founder and Executive Director for a virtual info session on October 20th at 5pm and learn how you can make a sustainable impact during your winter or summer break by participating in their three-week Global Leadership Program in Ghana. Register for the online info session here! Read on for more info about Saha Global:

Saha Global empowers women in rural communities in northern Ghana to solve their village’s need for clean water and electricity by providing business opportunities. They do this by bringing leaders from around the world to Ghana through our Global Leadership Program where they train local women to launch profitable social enterprises such as sustainable pure water and solar energy businesses. All of the revenue from these businesses stays in the community and is managed by the women entrepreneurs. To date, Saha Global has launched 71 clean water businesses and 5 solar electricity businesses, which empower 164 women entrepreneurs who serve 38,108 people. 100% of these businesses are still in operation today.

The three week Saha Global Leadership Program in Ghana has run successfully since the Summer of 2010, and over 10 Midd students have participated. The Saha site explains the program as follows:

Young leaders who participate in Saha’s three-week Global Leadership Program will be trained to become Saha Field Representatives. Before traveling abroad, they will fundraise to cover the start-up materials needed for each community business, as well as their in-country travel expenses. Once in Ghana, they will participate in a vigorous and comprehensive training program designed and led by our Saha Global team. Groups of four will be partnered with a rural community in which they will first introduce the business concept and its particular health, social and economic benefits, and then train local women to launch either a clean water or solar business.

By the end of the three-week program, these businesses will be up and running and the women entrepreneurs will be fully in charge of all operations. Our Saha Global team will then monitor the business for the next 5 years to ensure long-term success.

For more information about Saha Global, read their story hereSaha is currently accepting applications for 2015 Winter Global Leadership Program, which takes place in Ghana from December 28th – January 20th (J-TERM), as well as their summer 2015 program. Don’t miss the online info session today! All are welcome. 

What: Virtual Info Session for Saha Global
Date: Today, October 20
Time: 5 – 6pm
Place: Online, register here

Alcohol Policy at Stanford and Middlebury: Which Approach is Right?

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The most recent spark in the alcohol policy debate comes not from Middlebury, but from across the country at Stanford University where Miriam Pollock recently published an editorial comparing Middlebury and Stanford’s alcohol policy.  An incredibly well-written, and insightful piece, Pollock’s perspective casts new light on the different approaches collegiate institutions can take in addressing alcohol consumption.  What follows is a re-posting of the Stanford Review piece.  Please feel free to share your thoughts and comments below.  Credit is due to Miriam Pollock and the Stanford Review.

Students file into the stands above Youngman Field, decked out in white and blue. The visiting team scores a quick touchdown, dampening the crowd’s spirits. But soon thereafter, quarterback Matt Milano launches an eighty-yard drive that ends in a dramatic touchdown. The students and alumni in the stadium go wild.

Meanwhile, a junior, removed from the action of the game, stumbles across Route 30 into the woods and unloads his lunch. He can barely walk. The junior had drunk heavily at the pre-football game tailgate. A Public Safety officer spots the student and determines he needs to be transported to the hospital. The student is sent to the hospital and safely recovers from his alcohol poisoning. Subsequently, he will receive both punishment and counseling.

The scene should be familiar to anyone who has attended a college football game: some students go too crazy at the tailgates, endangering themselves and others. Often, they will never even make it to the game. This scenario — with a different stadium, different quarterback, and different students — could play out almost anywhere in the US. But in this case the specific game took place at Middlebury College, a small liberal arts school in Vermont.

Understandably, the Middlebury administration — like many college administrations across the country — wants to reduce incidents of binge drinking at tailgates. And so, on September 16th of this year, Erin Quinn, Director of Athletics, announced a new policy. Alcohol was completely prohibited at tailgates, even for those 21 and over. (“Loud” music was also banned, causing students to question whether the policy was meant to protect them or to prevent them from having fun.)

While ensuring students remain safe is a laudable goal, this misguided policy is unlikely to accomplish that. In fact, this policy may even encourage binge drinking. Furthermore, it impinges on student freedom. Contrast all this with Stanford University, which has a far more relaxed alcohol policy. Residential staff champion an “open-door” policy. Students are encouraged to drink with their doors open; in turn, Residence Assistants (RAs) promise only to intervene if students’ safety is at risk. Is Stanford’s model more effective at keeping students safe? Which is right — the zero-tolerance approach, or Stanford’s more tolerant one?

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